9 Powerhouse Benefits of CrossFit Endurance & Mobility

In talking with runners who have followed a CFE program and coaches who work with them, these are benefits that commonly are brought up.

CrossFit Endurance

Improvement in overall health and quality of life. Rather than counting on the endorphin high from a daily run to feel good, the multi-dimensional approach of CFE (in addition to endurance, skill and stamina training: a clean diet, mobility, plenty of sleep, recovery, hydration) produces greater over health, better metabolic and hormonal health, and sustains a higher-quality feeling throughout the day.

Reducing injury risk by supplanting “junk” mileage—aka easy runs or recovery runs—with functional-fitness workouts that train the same energy systems. For those runners who have exceptional mechanics and running skill, this might not be a priority, but for those who are dealing with with faulty mechanics, imbalances and such, at the heart of CFE is the drive to correct these underlying problems, but also by replacing lower-priority runs with functional-strength/stamina workouts, the overall pounding of the pavement is lessened and muscles and connective tissues are treated with greater care with longevity in mind.

Countering linear one-direction duty cycles (running in one direction for huge amounts of time) by incorporating exercise that includes additional planes of movement. In the act of running a mile, the body moves within a contained usage of ranges of motion and within in a single plane. This is where the Be An Athlete First, Runner Second philosophy comes in. By increasing the variation of movement and engaging in a variety of movement patterns, a runner creates a wider foundation of athleticism from which to count on.

Increasing power and speed through strength and explosive power training. As the voluminous research accumulated by Owen Anderson has shown, an investment in strength and power is an investment in improved economy and endurance. As elite triathletes like Mark Allen and Dave Scott originally explored, and now coach, strength training was their secret ingredient in the durability required to run a fast marathon after a 112-mile bike ride.

Countering the damage distance running does to mobility and range of motion. This is related to #3, but worth mentioning again: running alone, particularly without a movement practice like Kelly Starrett’s mobility program, yoga or otherwise, muscles (think lower back, hamstring and hip flexors in particular) shorten. As range of motion gets eaten away, a runner loses the capacity to run correctly. Duck feet, heel-striking, valgus knee patterns and the sort all begin to creep into the stride. It doesn’t matter what shoe you’re running in when this begins to happen. Your soft tissues start grinding way and performance capacity is reduced.

Tapping positive hormone responses, like human growth hormone and testosterone. A particularly valuable effect for older runners. Lifting heavy things taps the body’s systems. Lean muscle mass and preventing the loss of lean muscle mass are key benefits.

Revving the body’s fat-burning metabolism and thus making for positive body composition changes with weight and strength training. High-intensity strength/power training may only take five to 10 minutes of effort, but the effect is long-lasting—the body’s metabolism burns hot throughout the day and night.

Improving the connection between the body’s engines–the hips and the shoulders–and the muscles of the arms and legs through the compound movements used in Crossfit workouts. Even simple combinations of bodyweight exercises like burpees, push-ups and mountain climbers can help achieve this effect through awareness. If running has been your sole method of exercise for a long time, it’s not uncommon that you fail to put to use the largest centers of power in the body, especially the muscles of the trunk. In conjunction with skill training, CFE works to unify the power capacities of the human body.

Faster recovery from races. Talk to an experienced CFE runner and this is a big one—-they run a half marathon or full marathon on Sunday, follow the CFE recovery protocol the night after the race, and you just don’t hear about them limping around the next day (or for the next week) as you might with less dimensional runners.

Faster recovery from races. Talk to an experienced CFE runner and this is a big one—-they run a half marathon or full marathon on Sunday, follow the CFE recovery protocol the night after the race, and you just don’t hear about them limping around the next day (or for the next week) as you might with less dimensional runners.

Unbreakable Runner by Brian MacKenzie and TJ MurphyIn their new book, Unbreakable Runner, CrossFit Endurance™ founder Brian MacKenzie and veteran journalist T.J. Murphy examine long-held beliefs about how to train, tearing down those traditions to reveal new principles for a lifetime of healthy, powerful running.

Unbreakable Runner includes CrossFit-based training programs for the most popular running race distances from 5K to ultramarathon.

Now available! Autographed copies of Unbreakable Runner from Brian MacKenzie!

Find Unbreakable Runner in your local bookstore, CrossFit gym, or from these online retailers: VeloPress, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Chapters/Indigo, your local bookstore

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One thought on “9 Powerhouse Benefits of CrossFit Endurance & Mobility

  1. Good Afternoon,I own this book in hard copy and enjoyed it very much.I have a specific question about the training programs and do not have facebook.Who can I ask that of?The question is.In the advanced programs a time is given for doing the skill work, example 15 or 30 min.Does that mean you literally do 30 min of the same 5 movements? Thanks,Izzy Ortiz

    Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 19:15:28 +0000 To: izzyortiz@hotmail.com

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